10 Benefits of Chai Tea

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By charlie
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  • 1. Hayat , Khizar, et al. 'Tea and Its Consumption: Benefits and Risks.' Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2015, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24915350/
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Medical Expert Medical Expert

Chai is a Hindu word for tea that originated from cha, a Chinese translation for tea. Chai tea has been used by beverage lovers throughout the globe and is the second consumed liquid after water.1Hayat , Khizar, et al. ‘Tea and Its Consumption: Benefits and Risks.’ Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2015, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24915350/ This century-old beverage is prepared using various ingredients, including milk, sweetener and rich black tea.

Spices, including ginger, cinnamon, black pepper and cardamom, are often added to the tea to create its characteristic flavor. In the modern world, chai tea experts have improved flavors, including milkshakes and chocolate chai, to create new taste experiences.2Chai! - What is Chai?’ Chai! Spice Milk Tea, www.chai-tea.org/whatisit.html Apart from being sweet and and spicy, chai tea comes with possible health benefits.

Antioxidant Features

Tea has antioxidants that protect body cells from destruction by free radicals, which arise from oxidative stress. Free radicals are compounds that stem from chemicals in foods and pollutants from the surrounding environment. These antioxidants are known to help prevent common diseases such as cancer and heart disease. Research studies found that tea plants have natural antioxidants called polyphenols.

The antioxidants have a positive impact on biochemical processes in the body by helping to reduce inflammation.3Khanum, Hafeeza, et al. ‘Quality, Antioxidant Activity and Composition of Indian Black Teas.’ Journal of Food Science and Technology, Springer India, 10 Mar. 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5380613/ Stress from free radicals has been linked to a number of chronic conditions, which tea can potentially prevent.

Chai Tea

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