10 Dislocated Elbow Symptoms

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By albert
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Reviewed: Dr. Gromatzky
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The elbow is a joint formed where the upper arm bone meets with the forearm bones. An elbow dislocation occurs when the radius and/or ulna bones of the forearm dislocate from their place against the humerus bone of the upper arm.

Elbow dislocation is the most common type of dislocation in children. In adults, elbow dislocation is only second to shoulder dislocation. Trauma such as a fall is the most common cause of elbow dislocation.

An elbow joint dislocation may be complete or partial, called subluxation. In a complete elbow dislocation, the three bones disengage completely, while in a partial dislocation, the bones are only partially disengaged. Below are 10 dislocated elbow symptoms.

Symptom #1: Pain

Pain is one of the first symptoms of a dislocated elbow. The pain is usually worse when you move the elbow. For this reason, you are likely to hold your dislocated elbow in one place next to your body.

The amount of pain will also depend on the type of dislocation. A complete dislocation, in which all the three bones constituting the elbow joint come apart, can lead to the pinching of nerves traveling across the elbow. This can cause excruciating pain. It is always a good idea to visit the emergency department if you suffer a dislocated elbow. Meanwhile, you can take an over-the-counter anti-inflammatory like ibuprofen to reduce the pain.

Dislocated Elbow

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