German Measles Symptoms, Treatments and More

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By christine
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Reviewed: dr. vanta
Article Sources Article Sources
  • 1. 'Rubella.' Mayo Clinic, Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, 31 Mar. 2020, www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/rubella/symptoms-causes/syc-20377310.
  • 2. 'Rubella' (German Measles). National Foundation for Infectious Diseases, 13 July 2020, www.nfid.org/infectious-diseases/rubella/.
  • 3. 'Rubella.' Encyclopædia Britannica, Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 18 Mar. 2021, www.britannica.com/science/rubella.
  • 4. 'Rubella (German Measles).' Rubella (German Measles) | Michigan Medicine, www.uofmhealth.org/health-library/hw181833.
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German measles, also known as rubella, is a virus that causes a distinctive red rash. It has the appearance of measles, but rubella is a different viral infection. Although it's less severe than the measles virus, it can cause serious complications for unborn babies.

Rubella isn't common in many nations because of the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine. However, unvaccinated individuals can still get and spread the virus. German measles isn't as infectious as measles, but anyone with the virus should take preventive measures to reduce the spread and protect unborn babies and newborns.1‘Rubella.’ Mayo Clinic, Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, 31 Mar. 2020, www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/rubella/symptoms-causes/syc-20377310.

1. What is German Measles?

Rubella is a contagious viral infection that was eradicated from the U.S. in 2004 with the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine. It speeds through tiny droplets in the breath of infected individuals when they talk, sneeze, cough or share foods and drinks. German measles has mild symptoms, but it can cause birth injuries if transferred through the womb from mother to child.

The last outbreak of rubella occurred from 1964 to 1965. During the epidemic, 12.5 million Americans contracted it, 11,000 pregnant women lost their babies, 2,100 newborns died and 20,000 infants were born with congenital rubella syndrome.2‘Rubella’ (German Measles). National Foundation for Infectious Diseases, 13 July 2020, www.nfid.org/infectious-diseases/rubella/.

German Measles

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